Pebbles (Writephoto)

Inspired by and written for #Writephoto – thank you, KL

Form: Rondeau

Like a pebble in water tossed
Our deeds and words all have a cost
Whether good or bad we still pay
In-kind or in some other way
But do we know what can be lost?
Acts of kindness are free of cost
A deed of love and thoughtful host
If one act can make someone’s day
Like a pebble
With our cruel deeds, we can be lost
But it’s not we who bear the cost
A loved one hurt will rarely say
But their pain ripples anyway
Let ripples be kind and uncrossed
Like a pebble

©JezzieG2023

Rondeau Notes

The Rondeau can be a challenging form for the poet. Consisting of three stanzas, a quintet, a quatrain, and a sestet, the first phrase of the first line, or the whole first line sets the refrain (R). The meter is eight-syllable or ten-syllable line, but it is the poet’s choice if that is iambic tetrameter or pentameter.

The rhyme scheme is
(R)aabba aab(R) aabba(R)

Example

In Flanders Field by Lt. Col. John McCrae, M.D.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields

The Four Times of Day: Evening

The Four Times of Day: Evening by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, 1858. Oil on wood. National Gallery, London, UK

The Four Times of Day: Evening
Form: Rondeau
Theme: Peace
Subject: The Four Times of Day: Evening by Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot

Those muted tones of silver-green
Reflect the path where faith has been
And the man of mystery makes his way
A pilgrimage at the end of day
His silence, understanding the scene
He speaks not of where he has been
Of things he’s done and things he’s seen
Tonight his words are meant to pray
Those muted tones
A spirit of love can’t be seen
His soul knows what it all can mean
As through the trees, he makes his way
His silence says all there is to say
In muted tones

©JGFarmer2022

Curls of Smoke

Curls of Smoke
Form: Rondeau
Theme: Love
Subject: A cigarette

The afterglow, a quiet smoke
No words, passion already spoke
Of the deepest love we declared
In intimate moments we shared
A love only we can invoke
For love is truly that bespoke
With desires that the heart awoke
When our two souls as one were paired
The afterglow
In the curls of cigarette smoke
Embraced by love none can revoke
For love finds its way unimpaired
By mundane words the others shared
We were one when ‘I love you’ spoke
The afterglow

©JGFarmer2021

Rondeau Notes

The Rondeau can be a challenging form for the poet. Consisting of three stanzas, a quintet, a quatrain, and a sestet, the first phrase of the first line, or the hole first line sets the refrain (R). The meter is eight syllable or ten syllable line, but it is the poet’s choice if that is iambic tetrameter or pentameter.
The rhyme scheme is
(R)aabba aab(R) aabba(R)

Example

In Flanders Field by Lt. Col. John McCrae, M.D.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields